BADD ’16: Ablesim In Social Media

Today is Blogging Against Disablism Day. Blogging Against Disablism Day

I remember one of the first things I learned about the internet was don’t click on banner ads because most of them were viruses that could destroy your computer. As a result, it takes a lot to get me to even glance at an ad anywhere on the internet.

Every couple of weeks something happens to my computer, or rather the internet.
It thinks I speak Spanish.

I don’t know where or rather how it comes to this conclusion. I took Spanish for years in school but I can only remember a handful of words, none of which can be put together to form a coherent sentence.

I know people are worried that the data miners will find out too much about them from their social media habits. I have the same concerns; however, I’d need the internet to get something remotely right before I get that concerned.

In addition to thinking I speak Spanish the internet also thinks I use catheters (among other things) and want to sue people over the fact that I’m disabled.

That last one has made me change my social media engagement practices.

I realized that not paying attention to ads I am being complacent in what people assume I feel about being disabled. Yes, it would be nice to have more money at my disposal but that would mean stating that I think it’s wrong that I have a disability.

I’m sure whatever algorithms used pick up on the fact that I write about disability, and not being human don’t go much further than that. Still nearly 100% of the ads I see portray a negative view of disability.

Last week I started to not only look at the ads in my news feeds but do something about them too.

I’ve alternated between reporting “this ad is not relevant to me” and “this ad is offensive.”

Because 99% of them are not relevant to me, but they could be relevant to someone else.

I want to label all of them offensive because they’re offensive to me, but I admit I may be slightly oversensitive given that I’ve gone to paying attention to virtually none of it to all of it in the span of a day.

The internet is a powerful tool, it provides so much good to everyone who has access to it, but it also provides a lot of bad (and/or useless) information. Anyone can say anything they want and they can get away with it.

What does this mean for the disability community?

It means that ableism can come from anywhere, obviously.

It’s a good thing really. Not that ableism is ever a good thing but it gives advocates, like myself, talking points we might not have thought of if it wasn’t for things that came across our path that we didn’t agree with.

For every 1 ableist item we see we should come up with at least 2 disability items to highlight the positives of having a disability. The disability community may not have the money but we have the numbers, and more are joining the community every day.

For example, (and this is just one of the many examples obviously) the parents of the newly diagnosed child should be able to sit down at their computer and be able to find the good things about being disabled alongside some of the harsh realities. Because being disabled isn’t all doom and gloom, sadness and pity, or worthlessness or being less than.

Would I like ableism to be a thing of the past? Absolutely, but the world is full of ignorant people so, although it may seem like a pipedream now that doesn’t mean it has to be one in the future.

I’ll keep doing my part in small ways, big ways, and every way in-between.

Now about the internet thinking I can speak Spanish thing………

Blogging Against Disablism Day, May 1st 2016

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