Disability & Body Image

Body image is a big issue and so is disability so disability and body image is a big(ger) issue. I’ve watched a few videos related to the “body image tag” from Robyn, Annie, and Gabby in particular, and it got me thinking (not enough to start a Y0uTube channel mind you). Here are my thoughts, in the hopes that maybe it’ll help someone in some way.

1) Do you think you are “traditionally/mainstream” attractive? Does it matter to you?

I don’t think I’m “traditionally/mainstream” attractive for a few reasons but the one I’d like to mention is because I have a disability. Mainstream society, thanks in big part to the media, doesn’t find disability traditionally attractive. So no I’m not traditionally attractive, but there is “a lid for every pot,” as they say, so I’m attractive to someone (hopefully not in that devotee way).

It doesn’t matter to me that I’m not traditionally attractive. I’ve put too much work into my body to make it functionally and “workable” for myself, but I’d be lying if I didn’t say I sometimes care, even slightly. What matters more to me is the devotee issue. From my experience I struggle with people finding me attractive without some sort of fetish attached to it

2) What was your biggest insecurity when you were a teenager? What is it now? How has your body image changed?

My biggest insecurity as a teenager was that people would notice that I was disabled. In hindsight it seems pretty ridiculous since it’s obvious that I have a disability. I wasn’t big on using mobility aids as a teenager because I wanted to blend in, plus I didn’t think I needed them.

My biggest insecurity is wondering if people are looking at me and why.  I know people look at me. It’s so commonplace in my life now that I hardly notice it but when I do I wonder why they’re looking at me. Are they shocked? Inspired? Unimpressed?

My body image has changed a lot especially in the last few years and it has a lot to do with my last surgery. I know most people think/feel that your self-image should be tied to an event or something else and I used to say the same thing. Then I turned 30 and things became solidified even more. I’ve come to appreciate what my body has become and the work I put into it. I’ve also come to accept that I’m probably not anyone’s idea of “perfect” but I am who I am take it or leave it.

3) How does your style play into your body image?

Style does play a part in my body image. I try to put some effort into my style knowing that in a way how I portray myself will impact how someone else will view people with disabilities. I don’t spend hours getting ready every day but I do make sure my clothes match and are suitable for whatever I have planned that day. Also when I feel like I look good I tend to tend to be in a better mood.

4) How do you define your beauty?

Is it bad that this is the hardest question for me to answer? I know I’m not obviously beautiful and I’m totally fine with that. But it’s not like I can point to one thing and tell you that’s what makes me beautiful either, probably because it depends on the day. I do have this odd sense of satisfaction of seeing a good photograph and realizing I’m either in it or I took it.

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One thought on “Disability & Body Image

  1. I find it quite annoying that society doesn’t view disabled people as “attractive”. This is especially a problem on online dating websites because people tend to take one look at you and pass.

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