Speechless For Now, Or For Good

I recently wrapped my 1st stint as a podcaster. It was an interesting experience to say the least. It wasn’t something I ever envisioned doing but I didn’t want to turn down the opportunity.  It was a new challenge. And in all honesty, it was one I wasn’t always up for.

Now that the season is over I’m taking time to evaluate whether I want to do another season. If you listen to the season finale episode you’ll hear me joke about whether you’ll hear me on Special Chronicles in the future.

Honestly, I haven’t made any decision either way at this point.

There’s a lot to consider, now that I know what podcasting really involves.

-I have other projects I’d like to work on.
-Do I have the time for everything?
-Do I have the energy for everything?
-Can I produce enough quality content?
-Do I want to produce more content than I’m already producing?
-Do I have anything left to say that someone hasn’t said or can’t say?
-I went into this venture thinking it would be a temporary gig, although it lasted longer than I thought, that doesn’t mean it wasn’t still meant to be temporary.

And that’s just the short list of thoughts.

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When does one truly know when to step back, move on, or carry on?

I guess we’ll all find out the answer in the fall, at least in this case.

Lifeguards Do More Than Save Lives

I always found it odd when people said I was “more than up for the challenge” while I was growing up, especially when I really wasn’t given a choice in the matter. However, those types of voices get fewer as you get older, and I’ve discovered that I really do like a challenge.

One day while leaving the pool I noticed that there would be a swim challenge. After looking at the flyer, and checking my unreasonable expectations at the curb, I signed up.

I’m not the biggest fan of lifeguards, especially ones I see all the time and they act like they can’t be bothered by anything. So, my least favorite part of the swim challenge was that a lifeguard had the sign off on the number of laps I swam each day.

There were a few problems with this:

  1. No one other than the swimmer was counting the laps.
  2. Most of the lifeguards were clueless about this challenge so asking them to sign off came as a surprise.
  3. Keeping the record sheet dry was difficult, to say the least.

I had a feeling from the beginning that I wouldn’t reach the end point of the virtual swim but I still held out hope that I just might make it anyway. At some point, I realized there were few days left and I wasn’t even going to make it to the half way mark. I was really thinking I would make it at least that far.

Feeling defeated I thought about taking my foot off the gas and taking a few intentional rest days, but I also wanted to see just how far I would get by the end date. On one of the last days I got out of the pool and approached the lifeguard after writing in my laps.

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I didn’t reach my goal but that lifeguard refueled me, which people need once and a while.  It took some of the sting out of not reaching my goal and encouraged me to try if the opportunity ever comes around again.

Lifeguards are on deck in case a life (or more) needs to be saved but sometimes they don’t just do that, and that’s just as important.

The Gift Of GIFs

Graduate school has officially taken over my brain. I can’t formulate my own thoughts without consulting some set of instructions and analyzing them to death before doing anything.

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And even then, nothing makes sense.

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I embark on the assignment anyway praying I’m on the right track furiously texting classmates under the theory that, “if most of us do the same thing, we’re not wrong.”

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I still lose my mind the second someone says something that I consider to be criticism.

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Then I question every decision I’ve ever made in my entire life.

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And then I swear it isn’t worth it.

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In the end I get up the next morning & do it all again.

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Why I: Survived Bullies

I’ve been called an old soul a few times, as most recently as a few weeks ago. This makes me laugh because I am nothing of the sort, at least I don’t feel like it.

It’s true I use to play At@ri, jumped on the St@wberry Shortcake/C@re Bear bandwagon before my peers, and I counted down until the premiere of the new D@llas series because I’ve watched nearly all the episodes of the 80s series; but I think that hardly qualifies me as an “old soul.”

I’m my parents’ only child; however they come from big families themselves so my extended family is vast, yet fairly close.

My aunt grew up taking care of my dad, because that’s what kids in big families do. Their birthdays are a day apart (and a few years), which just adds to their closeness.

My childhood was filled with family events and play dates of every type, shape, and size available.

For the most part I was around boys my own age or people who were older (& I won’t be saying how much in case some of those people ever find this blog). Plus only children are pretty much “grown up” by 7 since they spend so much time around adults, or so I’ve heard.

It’s all ingredients for an interesting childhood. As Opr@h says, “It’s what I know for sure.”

(This also explains why the first time I lived with girls I was almost 20, and had a really hard time with it all. And the first time I moved into a house with people I barely knew I was not-that-secretly happy that one was a dude. It’s an absolute myth that girls are cleaner, at least when it comes to bathrooms…..especially when it comes to bathrooms)

I’ve been more or less “at the end of the line” when it comes to development (CP aside). When everyone’s babies became kids, I was the baby. When the kids became teenagers, I was the kid. When everyone had school years in the rearview mirror I was looking at colleges.

Let’s not forget I was the little kid for all the big kids to practice parent, and just flat out have fun with. Although there was one time during the flood of “how are things going at school” emails and calls when an older cousin was having something of a midlife crisis and decided to share it with me, when I was 18 and trying to not flunk out of school.

The funny thing is, if you want to call it that, was that I don’t ever remember telling anyone I was bullied (except for begging my parents to let me transfer schools). My all knowing babysitter knew, but her younger sisters went to the same school and had classrooms on the same floor, so she had an exclusive to my preteen/teen torture.

If I ever said anything no one ever made a big deal out of it. It would’ve made matters worse anyway. Instead I was almost always given advice that didn’t pertain to the moment, it was lifelong advice. It would’ve been nice to have someone go in an “have a talk” with one of the bullies but what I got instead ended up being exactly what I needed.

Proof that there’s a light at the end of the tunnel.

And some pretty great people I get to call my family.

I survived being bullied because I knew the “b!tchy girl phase” doesn’t live in everyone forever. I saw enough of it in my home life to look past it in my school life, and when I couldn’t someone managed to get some sense into me one way or another.

*A similar version of this post was written on September 26, 2012

BADD ’17: In Defense Of The Able-Bodied

I’ve wanted to write this post for a long time, but it’s one of those “tread lightly” things, and that’s not my best skill, so I’ve put it off, but I think today is the day.

I’ve written before on whether or not it’s possible for those with disabilities to be ableist towards others with disabilities. While it’s a divisive topic I think it’s an important one to acknowledge and discuss in certain situations.

As excited as I was to join a swim team I knew I wanted to continue when the season was over, which ended up not being in the cards for a few reasons. I also knew the season was really just a start and I needed to find the next step.

I asked people for advice, people who have been around and faced some of the same challenges, but I didn’t exactly go how I thought.

Before I even made a viable connection, people tried to talk me out of what I had in mind.

It didn’t make sense to me, if the end goal was to create a more inclusive environment what was so bad about my plan?

I showed up to my 1st masters swim practice with extreme caution. I wasn’t sure it was going to work, especially after watching the junior team practice, but I needed to give it a try. I had 1 private session with a coach a few months before and I was still reaping the benefits. If I backed out of a chance at team practices I would regret it.

It was a hard practice but everyone seemed welcoming. I’ve kept a list of goals since I started swimming again. I had been steadily chipped away at them but things stalled, until this practice. I ended up crossing off almost everything else on the list.

Then nearly everyone who encouraged me to seek out other opportunities tried to talk me out of it, even when I didn’t ask for their opinion.

It wasn’t good for me to leave people “who are like me” or “could understand someone like me,” at least according to them.

I understand their concern, at least usually, but what confused me was these comments were coming from people actively working towards more inclusive sports. So, why shouldn’t I join an able-bodied team? Especially if it’s a better fit, in almost every way.

I know there are those out there who feel that I’m betraying “my people” but if the ultimate goal is for people with disabilities to be seen as equals to the able-bodied community so we need to become part of the able-bodied community whenever an ideal situation presents itself.

At least that’s what I think.

I’m not going to say that the change has been seamless. It’s been full of adjustments, not so great practices, and at times downright culture shock.

But I can say without a doubt that I wouldn’t be where I am today if I hadn’t made the change.

And that’s made me think a lot more about inclusion.

When we see a chance for inclusion we should take it, we need to take it. It doesn’t always come with the betrayal of the disability community, and if we keep seeing it that way then we probably should change our approach.

Inclusion isn’t a one-sided issue, we can’t just stand around and wait for people to include us. We can’t just yell, and bitch, and moan about it either, there has to be some meaningful effort on our part, and it doesn’t have to be some grand gesture either.

Sometimes “just” showing up and seeing what could happen is enough.

Blogging Against Disablism Day, May 1st 2017