Cerebral Palsy: The Review

Another Cerebral Palsy Awareness month has come to a close. In year’s past I’ve come up with some kind of “wrap up,” this year I have nothing. The tank is empty.

Note to self: do a better job organizing posts to avoid blogging in circles.

Another note to self: Make plans.

Additional note to self: keep a file of topics and questions.

Here’s A Complete Listing Of This Year’s Posts:
End The Word
What Is Cerebral Palsy
The Matter Of Privacy
Athleticism + CP = ?
Things That Make You Say Ow
BYOC
Life Without An Off Switch
Hide & Seek
CP is a Finger Print
Is This Thing On?
Of Ice & Pies
Gifts Of CP
It’s Not Easy Being Green
CP See, CP Do
Brain Matter(s)
Confessions From A CP Adult
An Ode To Sweet Caroline
Cerebral Palsy Awareness Day
Is Disability A Choice Or A Destiny?
Acknowledging Your Personal Puzzle
A Deck Of Cards
PwDs Are People Too

Lists of posts from years past:
What Is Cerebral Palsy Anyway: Review
March = Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month + Review
HAWMC Recap

Is This Thing On?

My of my biggest worries as a blogger is that I repeat myself. I’ve been at this for long enough now that I know it’s more likely to become a reality, therefore I have tried to be better about organizing my posts.

However, I almost wrote a post today that was going to be almost identical to a post I wrote last year, almost to the day.

Are you creeped out? Because I was, kinda.

I feel like I’ve blogged myself in a complete circle.

I may be on the verge of an existential bogging crisis.

I don’t want to keep reposting previous posts, although sometimes they do have their place, but what else do I have to say?

How much more can I write about Cerebral Palsy & what it’s like to live with it?

My brain can only crank out so much information before I’m just shouting into a void, regardless of what anyone else thinks.

The last time I felt this way I was told it was OK if I repeated myself because people needed to hear it again, but even that can only last so long before I sound like a raving looney tune.

Social networks have been great to me in this year’s undertaking. See a tweet. Have an idea. Write a post. Include tweet in post. Add post to retweeted tweet.

But I don’t feel like that can carry me though the rest of the month, or even through the next week.

I could get ideas from my podcasts but here’s the thing with that: as soon as we stop recording I forget everything I’ve said, which makes doing the show notes interesting (because I have no interest in listening to myself).

I know people are reading, sharing, and commenting.

Is there anything you’d like me to say, or try to say, that I haven’t already said?

I’m hesitant to promise an “ask me anything” type post but I’d be willing to give it a shot if people are open to hearing what I have to say (or not hearing anything if I deem something off limits, but I’ll disclose that).

CP Is A Fingerprint

There’s a nice thing that comes with having a blog, you can pretty much put your thoughts out there and let it go. But there are times when people want to engage with you, and it’s great, but also a challenge.

Having a blog about CP is no exception, especially when resources are limited and CP is such a broad diagnosis.

Even if two people with CP have the exact same diagnosis on paper it doesn’t mean that they’re effected the same way, in fact I can almost guarantee that they won’t be effected the same way.

So, when I get asked questions or get presented with other people’s opinion on my care, or the case of others, I ask everyone to take it with a grain of salt.

I don’t have all the answers, but no one else does either, but it’s hard to remember that when you so desperately want answers (or want to give advice).

It’s natural to want to be surrounded in a community of people you have something in common with but when it’s something like Cerebral Palsy it can be hard to find the common ground you’re looking for because at first someone may seem “like you” but when differences start to appear it can be hard to not compare & contrast (and then potentially get bitter).

We are a community, but it can be easy to forget that we’re individuals first.

What Is Cerebral Palsy?

For the past couple of years I’ve devoted my writing efforts during March to Cerebral Palsy.

Why?

Because despite being the most common disability among children very few people know what Cerebral Palsy is. Now for a medical condition that was first studied in the 1860s, (but probably first identified during the time of the Ancient Greeks) the fact that the everyday person probably doesn’t realize that they’ve probably at least seen 1 person with CP during their lifetime is, well, I don’t know what to call it.

Sad?

Disappointing?

Shocking?

Not surprising at all?

All of those, and then some more.

There are people who have heard of it but have more misconceptions than actual facts about what it is and what it isn’t.

And honestly, I wonder if it would be better if some of those people knew nothing at all, because their misconceptions run so deep and are so flawed that it might be better if they (or rather we) started from square one.

So here I go again.

What is Cerebral Palsy (CP) Anyway?

It’ll get into the technical aspects soon but I wanted to start with something simple for today:

keep-calm-its-only-cerebral-palsy

After I get into the basics I’ll get more personal, probably, because I can’t speak for everyone with CP; for two reasons (1) Cerebral Palsy effects each person that has it differently. No two cased of CP are exactly alike. (2) Also I don’t want to pretend I know everything so I can’t in good conscious speak for everyone who has CP. That just wouldn’t be fair to the CP community or everyone wanting to know about CP.

In previous years I’ve taken questions from readers and it’s been overwhelmingly positive so I’ll continue with that tradition, because if it ain’t broke….

If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment or fill out the contact form. You can even send me an email if that works better for you.

Until then…….

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*A similar version of this post first appeared on an old blog on March 1, 2016

Let’s Talk About Porn

Having a blog and a podcast is an interesting experience. Granted I didn’t think I’d be podcasting for that long. I thought it would be a sprint rather than a distance event, which this venture has now seemingly turned into.

I wanted to share our latest recording, and for a few reasons (1) it’s an important topic, (2) I didn’t feel the need to write down what I’ve already said, (3) I want your feedback on the topic.

I’ve talked about inspirational porn before but being able to have a mainstream TV show address it in a relatable way opened a door for me to be able to see the topic in a different way.

speechlessabc_fanpodcast_v02

Listen to H-E-R–HERO

How do you feel about inspirational porn?
Where or how do you think started inspirational porn?
Do you think inspiration porn started with Tiny Tim or someone else?
Did it start with the saints or maybe the life of Jesus Christ?
Do you think we’ll ever be able to get rid of inspirational porn altogether?

 

Now What?

This is the 3rd time I’m participated in HAWMC. Each year it comes at a less than ideal time and by the end I can’t wait to write the last post. This year is no different. As much as I get out of blogging everyday this time I just need to be able to check this off the list and move onto the next thing.

What is the next thing?

Practically speaking, there’s a paper to write, podcasts to record, and Christmas shopping to finish (which should’ve been finished by now, because I’m one of those people who shops throughout the year to avoid the added stress).

Ideally speaking, I have a project coming soon. Just how soon? It’s at the editor’s but I’ve already seen what may well become the final product. It turns out I’m very bad at providing feedback short of ripping something, anything, to shreds.

Then there’s grad school to finish which includes a capstone that needs writing. I feels like I’m in the middle of a triathlon I couldn’t find the time to train for, after I signed up and paid the entry fee, so I kind of should do it.

All of this pretty much leaves my career up to chance, word of mouth, and pure luck. It’s not that I haven’t wanted to speak and write more in the last year. It just hasn’t happened. I’m trying to see it as a positive, to give me the time to devote to other things without having to decide what to do or overextend myself.

That doesn’t mean that my life as an advocate is going to be put on the back burner. Another degree will add another dimension to my business, to my advocacy work, at least that’s the plan anyway. HAWMC isn’t the end of the line, it’s a stop on a journey to something greater. But like I’ve said already, the month has been long enough. It’s time to move on to the other things I have on the calendar on the way to where I eventually see myself being.

However, I’m available if someone needs me.

I’m participating in WEGO Health’s Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge. If you want to find out more about Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge visit their blog, Facebook, Twitter. You can find more posts by searching #HAWMC.

About Abandonment

One of my favorite posts from another health advocate comes from Jessica. Although the post deals with illness almost all of it can apply to living with a disability as well, probably because there’s a misconception that disability is similar to being sick.

2016-11-25

Read Jessica’s full post.

I’m participating in WEGO Health’s Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge. If you want to find out more about Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge visit their blog, Facebook, Twitter. You can find more posts by searching #HAWMC.

Tip Tuesday

Although I spend a fair amount of time engaged in some fashion in social media I have mastered none of it. In fact, I find it frustrating, meaning social media itself, not the mastery itself.

I have no expertise in it whatsoever.

Instead I find people who are and pick their brains to no end.

I’ve realized I can make better use of my time (and my sanity) if I don’t try to become an expert in everything.

(I may have studied a little too much Plato in college, but it makes this make sense)

A few years ago, I attended the Catholic New Media Conference. I’d like to tell you I did it on purpose but I just got lucky. It was small, reasonably priced, and easy to travel to. I had reached a point where I needed to learn more before I got buried in the noise of the internet.

I was so overwhelmed after one day, but I knew I was in the right place for the right reason, and I knew I wasn’t done learning from this pool of talent.

I went home and did my research, and then I kept tabs on the people that gave talks, the people I remembered seeing, even the people who started following me on Tw!tter for no reason in particular.

At the most recent CNMC I came prepared. I made two mental lists the “need to” and the “want to” list.

Patrick Padley was on the “need to” list. After sending an unknown amount of emails to companies I thought would be a good match for increasing CP awareness and getting no response. I knew I wanted to pick his brain to know what I could do differently, what I could do better.

Maria Johnson was also on the “need to” list. I needed to thank her personally for her help and inspiration. She made my brain light up like a pinball machine at my first CNMC and the lights haven’t dimmed much since.

Lisa Hendy was on the “need to” and “want to” list, for reasons that are too long to list. Let’s just say if you want to see what can happen with a small venture see Catholic Mom

And lest I forget Greg Willits who ended up at the top of my “want to” list after delivering his keynote. You know how there are people that can tell you things you don’t want to hear but when you hear it it doesn’t seem that bad? I never thought I’d thank someone for telling me things I didn’t want to hear.

Basically, my advice for using social media for advocacy is this, do what you’re good at (hopefully it’s something you like too). Seek out the advice of people who are experts in the areas in which you fall short.

I’m participating in WEGO Health’s Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge. If you want to find out more about Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge visit their blog, Facebook, Twitter. You can find more posts by searching #HAWMC.

Words Of Wisdom On Wednesday

Confession time: I’m horrible at giving advice (although I may be worse at taking it). I try, but it’s usually misunderstood. So, I’m not sure what advice I would or maybe should give to health activists starting out but I’ll give it a shot.

-Be yourself

-Tell the truth

-Find your tribe

-Don’t try to be everything to everybody

-Look to others

-Do research

-Provide facts

-Get personal

-Set boundaries

-Build a community for your readers

-Ask questions

-Answer questions

-Be open to criticism

-Don’t take criticism personally

-Jump on bandwagons

-Experiment

-Take Risks

-Find what works for you

-Do what works for you

-Blaze your own trail

-Have fun

I’m participating in WEGO Health’s Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge. If you want to find out more about Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge visit their blog, Facebook, Twitter. You can find more posts by searching #HAWMC.

Spreading The Love

When you first start writing seriously you tend to look for others in your situation, or at least that’s what I did. When you don’t find any, or at least what you were looking for, you start looking at other health blogs for a “similar enough” community to try to emulate.

I found myself reading a lot of CF blogs, and learning a lot from them. I didn’t find everything missing from the CP community that I had been looking for but close enough. I wanted to connect with people in the CF community to see what I could learn and bring to the CP community.

For example: the issue(s) of transitioning from pediatric to adult care since CP & CF are both lifelong conditions that involve transitions.

It didn’t take long before I found Run Sickboy Run. It seemed like every CF blog mentioned Ronnie at least once. Clearly he was good at whatever he was doing.

I’ve been able to learn a lot about self-advocacy as well as blogging in general from Ronnie. If I can have a quarter of the impact on the CP community that Ronnie’s had on the CF community than I’ll consider it a success; because I don’t think I can even come close to what he’s done (like creating a social network for the CF community).

He’s also been kind enough to respond to my comments for him & leave his own for me. It’s truly something that makes a small time blogger happy. He’s also been nice enough to share his knowledge with me when one of my doctors brought up the possibility pulmonary function testing.

It’s from getting to know Ronnie though his blog (& guest posts by other CF patients) that I’ve found the type of community that people with CP should be a part of. In fact I’ve been suggesting to the professions since I started reading CF blogs that we should look to the CF community as a model for medical treatment; and believe it or not someone brought up the same idea at a CP conference.

Simply put, thanks Ronnie for all you do.

There are two other individuals I have gotten to know that blend health activism and everyday life well:

Jessica at Fashionably Ill & Sarah at Back To Carolina

They both show that professional patients are just normal people who just probably more familiar with their doctors.

*A similar version of this post was written on April 14, 2013

I’m participating in WEGO Health’s Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge. If you want to find out more about Health Activist Writer’s Month Challenge visit their blog, Facebook, Twitter. You can find more posts by searching #HAWMC.