Arming For The Future

One morning I woke up and got dressed, it’s what I do most days, but this morning in particular was different.

I was planning this outfit for at least a week.

20170608_112724

It wasn’t fancy by any means but, for me, it was more important than any fancy dress (or anything else). It was part of the most important presentation of my life (at least so far).

One of the last pieces of my master’s degree was completing a capstone of some sort. Originally, I was going to write a paper. I had been planning it since the beginning, and I wanted to be able to pull something I had written off a shelf in the library at a later date. I pictured future students finding my work and incorporating it into their own, just as I had done, but one sentence changed my mind.

“If you did a project it will have the potential to reach a greater audience.”

I thought back to the final projects I’d done in other courses. What could I use from any of those, if any.

I decided to do a project, but that would mean enrolling in the seminar rather than working by myself (a method I prefer, or at least I thought I would).

Before my project would be finished I would have to workshop it with a small group and then present it during the seminar.

I was, to the best of my knowledge, the only student in my class born with a physical disability. So, I didn’t just have to present my project. I also had to give everyone a crash course in living with a disability.

I put thought into every detail, over and over again. Knowing everyone would go back to their everyday lives I wanted them to come away with more than what they came with, other than how good my project was.

Mainly I wanted them to know that people with childhood disabilities grow up and become adults, that we’re probably not what they thought, that the disabled aren’t looking for pity or continually bitter. I wanted them to see disability from a different point of view.

The outfit was only the last piece of my part of arming my peers for the future.

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International Day Of Acceptance

IDoA

When I started gaining attention for being an “adult with special needs” (seriously that’s what I’ve been called, more than one should), I spent time reading other blogs, mainly seeing if there were any common myths out there that needed to be debunked (not many worth debunking, for the record).

I noticed that a few people, mostly CP moms (as in moms who have kids who have CP), would mention something called 3E Love. Curiosity got the best of me so I checked out 3E Love for myself.

I bought my 1st wheelchair heart tee shirt (& sweatpants) at my first Abilities Expo. I LOVE the sweatpants. I wonder how I ever traveled without them.

I bought my dad his first shirt before his first Abilities Expo, and did the same for my cousin (it’s become a tradition I guess).

Several people in my life have 3E Love products; my dad even uses a 3E Love sicker to cover up a ding on his car.

I was able to hear Stevie (also known as Annie’s brother) share the story of 3E Love & speak to him personally a few times.

I never had the opportunity to meet Annie but I have a feeling I would’ve liked her based on what I know about her. Our shared skill of using kitchen tools as accessibility aids notwithstanding, I’m pretty sure she was an awesome person to know.

3E Love & the Wheelchair Heart were created by Annie (also known as Stevie’s sister).

wheelieheart

Stevie & his family started the International Day of Acceptance as a way of remembering Annie.

Join in the movement of acceptance.

*A similar version of this post first appeared on an old blog on January 20, 2014 & January 20, 2017

International Day Of Acceptance

When I started gaining attention for being an “adult with special needs” (seriously that’s what I’ve been called, more than one should), I spent time reading other blogs, mainly seeing if there were any common myths out there that needed to be debunked (not many worth debunking, for the record).

I noticed that a few people, mostly CP moms (as in moms who have kids who have CP), would mention something called 3E Love. Curiosity got the best of me so I checked out 3E Love for myself.

I bought my 1st wheelchair heart tee shirt (& sweatpants) at my first Abilities Expo. I LOVE the sweatpants. I wonder how I ever traveled without them.

I bought my dad his first shirt before his first Abilities Expo, and did the same for my cousin (it’s become a tradition I guess).

Several people in my life have 3E Love products; my dad even uses a 3E Love sicker to cover up a ding on his car.

I was able to hear Stevie (also known as Annie’s brother) share the story of 3E Love & speak to him personally a few times.

I never had the opportunity to meet Annie but I have a feeling I would’ve liked her based on what I know about her. Our shared skill of using kitchen tools as accessibility aids notwithstanding, I’m pretty sure she was an awesome person to know.

3E Love & the Wheelchair Heart were created by Annie (also known as Stevie’s sister).

wheelieheart

Stevie & his family started the International Day of Acceptance as a way of remembering Annie.

Join in the movement of acceptance.

IDoA

*A similar version of this post first appeared on an old blog on January 20, 2014

International Day Of Acceptance

IDoA

When I started gaining attention for being an “adult with special needs” (seriously that’s what I’ve been called, more than one should), I spent time reading other blogs, mainly seeing if there were any common myths out there that needed to be debunked (not many worth debunking, for the record).

I noticed that a few people, mostly CP moms (as in moms who have kids who have CP), would mention something called 3E Love. Curiosity got the best of me so I checked out 3E Love for myself.

I bought my 1st wheelchair heart tee shirt (& sweatpants) at my first Abilities Expo. I LOVE the sweatpants. I wonder how I ever traveled without them.

I bought my dad his first shirt before his first Abilities Expo, and did the same for my cousin (it’s become a tradition I guess).

Several people in my life have 3E Love products; my dad even uses a 3E Love sicker to cover up a ding on his car.

I was able to hear Stevie (also known as Annie’s brother) share the story of 3E Love & speak to him personally a few times.

I never had the opportunity to meet Annie but I have a feeling I would’ve liked her based on what I know about her. Our shared skill of using kitchen tools as accessibility aids notwithstanding, I’m pretty sure she was an awesome person to know.

(I can do a lot with grilling tongs myself)

3E Love & the Wheelchair Heart were created by Annie (also known as Stevie’s sister).

wheelieheart

Stevie & his family started the International Day of Acceptance as a way of remembering Annie.

Join in the movement of acceptance.

*A similar version of this post first appeared on an old blog on January 20, 2014

International Day Of Acceptance

IDoA

When I started gaining attention for being an “adult with special needs” (seriously that’s what I’ve been called, more than one should), I spent time reading other blogs, mainly seeing if there were any common myths out there that needed to be debunked (not many worth debunking, for the record).

I noticed that a few people, mostly CP moms (as in moms who have kids who have CP), would mention something called 3E Love. Curiosity got the best of me so I checked out 3E Love for myself.

I bought my 1st wheelchair heart tee shirt (& sweatpants) at my first Abilities Expo. I LOVE the sweatpants. I wonder how I ever traveled without them.

I bought my dad his first shirt before his first Abilities Expo, and did the same for my cousin (it’s become a tradition I guess).

Several people in my life have 3E Love products; my dad even uses a 3E Love sicker to cover up a ding on his car.

I was able to hear Stevie (also known as Annie’s brother) share the story of 3E Love & speak to him personally a few times.

I never had the opportunity to meet Annie but I have a feeling I would’ve liked her based on what I know about her. Our shared skill of using kitchen tools as accessibility aids notwithstanding, I’m pretty sure she was an awesome person to know.

(I can do a lot with grilling tongs myself)

3E Love & the Wheelchair Heart were created by Annie (also known as Stevie’s sister).

wheelieheart

Stevie & his family started the International Day of Acceptance as a way of remembering Annie.

Join in the movement of acceptance.

*A similar version of this post first appeared on an old blog on January 20, 2014